Back To The Roots – A Look At Dubstep

A look at a dubstep rave




Dubstep has quickly became one of the most popular music genres across the world with club nights and parties springing up in cities all across the world with DJ’s elevated to superstar status in the blink of an eye. A lot of people will have heard Dubstep music and associated the sound with noise, mechanical grinding and electronic beeps but Dubstep has beginnings in a much more organic music with its roots over the ocean in Jamaica.

One of Jamaica’s biggest cultural exports to the world is Reggae music. With names like Bob Marley, Peter Tosh and Toots and the Maytals all hailing for the shores of this small island in the Caribbean. This music’s distinctive half time feel and off beat rhythms can be attributed to the drum beats in Dubstep. With the deep bass lines running throughout, it’s easy to see how this urban electronic music takes its influence from the Dub Reggae in Jamaica.

Along with the reggae influence, urban Garage is also seen to have a relation to Dubstep. The first Dubstep releases can be traced back to the lA look at a dubstep raveate nineties as remixes of popular Garage tracks but with less emphasis on the vocals whilst exhibiting a darker, much more experimental sound.  From this came the rise of some of the biggest names in the scene as the genre started to attract attention in the underground scenes of London, Nottingham and Leeds to name a few.

Names such as Skream, Rusko and Caspa became commonplace as Dubstep started to get a foothold in the mainstream. These innovators blended the wobbles of Garage, the Dubstep beat along with their own inventive twists creating a unique and individual music. Things have now changed and Dubstep is a worldwide phenomenon. In the US, the sound changed and became closer to what we know today mainly thanks to the electronic sensations Skrillex and Bassnectar but it lost some of its soul.  Today the reggae influence isn’t as prevalent due to the US influence but the UK scene will always have an attachment to the UK’s roots.




Facebook Comments

NO COMMENTS

LEAVE A REPLY